China

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China and IPR, part III-Caring about Causes

In my last blog, I detailed China’s continuing shortcomings with protecting intellectual property (IP) rights (IPR) and the emergence of new challenges. The question arises as to why these problems persist even though it has been more than 20 years since China joined the World Trade Organization (WTO), is a member of numerous IP-focused organizations such as the World Intellectual Property Organization, and faces constant pressure to improve its protection of foreign IP. This blog critically evaluates some of the most common explanations for this state of affairs. Such knowledge is critical for developing realistic business and policy recommendations.

Businesses and the Risk of Taking Stock in the Infrastructure Alphabet Soup Game

At the recent Group of Seven (G-7) meeting in Germany, the attending countries put forth the “Partnership for Global Infrastructure and Investment” (PGII), which is a revised version of the Build Better Back World (B3W) scheme that was launched at last year’s G-7 meeting. While there was never any concrete figure attributed to B3W, the United States (US) touted B3W would catalyze “hundreds of billions of dollars of infrastructure investment” for developing countries.

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China and IPR, part II-Patent (Copyright) (Trademark) (Etc.) Facts

This commentary explores China’s fulfillment of its intellectual property (IP) rights (IPR) obligations.[1] Herein, “compliance” requires more than Beijing’s embrace of policies, passage of laws, adoption of regulations, creation of IP administrative entities, or restructuring of its c

Dr. Jean-Marc F. Blanchard's picture

China and IPR, part I-A Persistent Problem with Property?

China’s protection of intellectual property (IP) remains a continuing and serious issue for foreign companies as the United States Trade Representative (USTR) made manifest in its 2021 Section 301 report and 2021 Report to Congress on China’s World Trade Organization (WTO) Compliance and the European Commission conveyed clearly in its 2021 Repor

Wong MNC Center Executive Director Jean-Marc F. Blanchard, Ph.D. Presents Paper at International Studies Association Annual Meeting

At the 2022 International Studies Association annual meeting in Nashville, Tennessee, Dr. Jean-Marc F. Blanchard, Founding Executive Director of the Mr. & Mrs. S.H. Wong Center for the Study of Multinational Corporations, presented a paper about Chinese outward foreign direct investment (FDI) and technology transfer (TT) to host countries; i.e., the places where FDI takes place, focusing on developing countries. Dr.

MNCs in the News - 2022-February

Didi Global retreats from its announced decision to cease operations in Russia. Chinese businesses in Ukraine have taken various steps to protect their workers and projects following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Indian tax officials launch tax probe of Huawei’s offices in India, raising further concerns about India’s stance towards Chinese tech companies. China Unicom Global criticizes the United States (US) Federal Communication Commission’s decision to terminate the operating license of its US subsidiary. As part of its contribution to Western sanctions against Russia, Japan institutes various economic sanctions against Russian businesses in Japan and implements a number of export restrictions, too. Extant Japanese economic sanctions against Russia and the possibility of more increase Japanese corporate concerns about the adverse ramifications for payments, operations in Russia, and lost export sales. The Korea Communications Commission tells both Apple and Google that they need to redo their plans for complying with Korea’s Telecommunication Business Act which has ramifications for in-app payment systems. Korean construction firms encounter multiple challenges as a result of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the subsequent imposition of economic sanctions on Russia.

MNCs in the News-2022-January

China’s Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM) touts that China will act to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) despite a challenging environment. In the wake of a backlash following its removal of Xinjiang products from its shelves, Guangdong Administration for Market Regulation fines Sam’s Club for deceptive consumer practices on its app. Beijing municipal government fines 7-Eleven China for the latter’s website maps that have problematic presentations of Taiwan and other territory. China’s work and the presence of dredgers at Cambodia’s Ream naval base concern the United States and others that China’s seeks to station military assets there. Indian tax authority probe causes it to demand Xiaomi India pay unpaid customs duties. Sri Lanka asks China for debt relief on loans used to pay for Belt and Road Initiative projects. Ruling parties from Japan and Taiwan agree to pursue cooperation on semiconductors to alleviate semiconductor shortages and address the China high-tech challenge. Japanese companies remain committed to Myanmar despite the latter’s serious political, economic, and other problems. The chair of Korea’s Fair Trade Commission (KFTC) promises to continue to improve the KFTC’s regulation while supporting innovation. Apple submits plan to Korea Communications Commission that allows alternative in-app payment systems and reduces payment fees.

Danielly Ramos has joined the Wong MNC Center as a Senior Research Fellow

Dr. Danielly Ramos has joined the Mr. & Mrs. S.H. Wong Center for the Study of Multinational Corporations as a Senior Research Fellow. She is Associate Professor at the Institute of International Relations and Director of the Center for Global Studies at the University of Brasília.

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Finding Greatness in China’s Greater Bay Area (GBA), part III: The GBA as (yet) another “Silicon Valley”

This series’s first blog notes the GBA seeks to create a global innovation, research, and technology hub in the mold of “Silicon Valley.” There are many reasons to expect success. These range from a “cocktail of inputs” including massive government support to huge capital pools to a strong ecosystem for research to prominent artificial intelligence, health tech, robotics, smart city, and telecommunications players with extensive patents and research and development (R&D) spending to broad and deep (and continuously improving) hard infrastructure.

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